Catlands

by Ana Čigon

Maček med vrati, 2024, animated, 2D animation, digital DCP, 1,77:1 (16:9), 25, c, 9 min
Ready to premiere
SI, HR

The film takes place in Catlands, the union of distinct feline territories inhabited by cats of various social statuses. The delicate established status quo is disrupted by newcomers trespassing the lawns of the cats’ united territories. To address this international issue, the most prominent residents devise a cunning plan, one that cannot be executed without harming some innocent victims.

screenwriter
Ana Čigon
director
Ana Čigon
producer
Viva Videnović
co-producer
Vanja Andrijević
animators
Kata Gugić, Ana Čigon, Bernarda Kristan, Ana Horvat, Lea Vučko, Damir Grbanović
director of photography
Ana Čigon
music composer
Tomaž Grom
film editor
Iva Kraljević
sound designer
Boštjan Kačičnik
featuring
Aphra Tesla, Tea Vidmar, Jošt Jesenovec, Blaž Šef, Ana Čigon
production
URGH!
co-production
Bonobostudio, RTV Slovenija
in collaboration with
Film Studio Viba Film
co-funding
Croatian Audiovisual Centre, Slovenian Film Centre
distribution
Bonobostudio

Bonobostudio
Vanja Andrijević
info@bonobostudio.hr

URGH!
Viva Videnović

viva@urgh.si

Ana Čigon

Ana Čigon (1982) is an established Slovene artist known for her video art, films and performances dealing with social issues which often contain elements of humour, irony and satire. She has made documentaries, experimental films and has worked in animation. It is in the latter that she recently found the most inspiration because of her academic background in painting and video art.

“This is a story about the European Union – specifically about how its ideals of unity and democracy collide with its policies regarding refugees. The EU's appearance, which often contradicts its politics, is reflected in the animation, where an idyllic environment with colourful, cute and funny cats eventually clashes with the brutality of an inhumane deportation. The scenery is full of details (like scratches and bandages on the newcomer cats) hinting at a less civilized story about to be revealed. However, all these elements are subtle and leave space for different interpretations until the final scene when a clearer statement is amplified by the politically tinted score of Beethoven's Ode to Joy.”